With the stay-at-home order nearly reaching its end, looking back, we find ourselves with lifestyles that we never thought possible. We gave attention to the things inside our home, we learned new hobbies, we spend time with our families, acquire new skills, tried new recipes, and we learn to fend for ourselves. As it turns out, we are sufficient enough.

Decluttering is in the top list of favourite activity that most people do during their longer time at home, and it has made most of us aware of how much we owned, especially clothes, it is safe to say that we owned more clothing in our wardrobe than several generations in the 1500s have throughout their lifetime. Which in the end made us reflect on how consumptive this generation are and how much waste we produce, be it from food or the clothes we don’t wear, and how it destroys the environment that we live in. We might not even deserve the brief-period of fresh air on the second quarter of 2020.

Staying-at-home has made us realize a few many things, that the earth is precious, and at the rate of how we go about our business right now, we are killing the only planet that can sustain us. We produced tonnes of waste daily, waste that eventually pollute our soil and body of water, which in turns reduce our access to raw materials needed to make the economy function. We need a different approach to preserve our economy, the ones that is more circular, that doesn’t deplete us of our finite resources. As BlackRock’s Larry Fink Letter to CEOs stated that sustainability have to be the centre of investment approach, which classified climate risk as an investment risk1. Therefore, capital must flow towards an economy that is more resilient and value the earth, a kind of economy that is circular, not the linear model that is vulnerable and high carbon that has been dominant2.

According to the data provided by global carbon project3, economic crisis always leads to higher output of carbon emissions and has spiked significantly after the global economic crisis in 2008 due to the demand of fossil fuels burnings to preserve the economy. COVID-19 undoubtedly is one of the biggest economic crisis of this century with businesses closing to prevent the spread of the virus. But this time will be different, the trend for circularity is growing and the societies are working together to break the chain of capitalism that were created by linear economy. With much help from the internet,  there is no better time to be connected than now, community is coming together to work on the common goals, to preserve the economy and well-being of humans and the environment.

Indicated by the rise of webinars and open-for-public programmes that appeared during this pandemic. One big example is Linear to Circular program by Ellen MacArthur Foundation, a 10 weeks webinars for anyone to learn deeper into circular economy. In which it gather massive participant from around the world. Resulting with people’s tendency to shift to a more circular lifestyle.

If there is one good thing on what the COVID-19 crisis teaches us, it showed us that we can navigate any emergency just fine, as well as, we, as a member of society work together to fight the crisis head on and join forces to find the best solution. Which includes a critical change that we have to make to preserve our livelihood, a haste to a more circular approach on how we go about our businesses.

Blackrock, “A Fundamental Reshaping of Finance”. Available at: https://www.blackrock.com/corporate/investor-relations/larry-fink-ceo-letter/ 

Circle Economy, “COVID-19: The Tragedy To End All Tragedies Of The Commons?”. Available at: https://www.circle-economy.com/blogs/covid-19-the-tragedy-to-end-all-tragedies-of-the-commons/ 

Global Carbon Project, “Correspondence: Rapid growth in CO2 emissions after the 2008-2009 global financial crisis”. Available at: https://www.globalcarbonproject.org/global/pdf/pep/Peters_2011_Budget2010.pdf/

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