Social

The Circular Economy Agenda in Indonesia

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Indonesia still need a more robust and firm strategy and action plan to implement the Circular Economy. It is critical to bring together leaders across industry, government, and civil society to shift the global economy more aggressively toward the circular economy, and Through build back better, we can build a more resilience circular economy concept that could maintain economic growth in a long term.

Supporting Indonesia in Developing a National Circular Economy Strategy

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Indonesia’s National Circular Economy Roadmap aims to create a clear strategy to help capture the benefits of a circular economy. Indonesia focus on 5 key areas of the Indonesian economy with high potential for circularity that can solve many of Indonesia’s problems. Where adoption of the identified circular economy opportunities could reduce waste generation in each sector by anywhere from 28-57% by 2030.

Can Indonesia establish a circular economy?

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As a member of the international community, Indonesia needs to play an active role in ensuring global sustainability. The alarming threat of climate change should be a concern for every country. A comprehensive transformation to a circular economy might be the answer to this dire situation. We believe now is really the time for the Indonesian government to start designing a comprehensive policy reform that changes its economic approach, from linear to circular. It must strategically think about ensuring that this policy is built on a circular economy and work together with related stakeholders for its successful implementation.

The concept of a circular economy focuses on redesigning waste to create other valuable goods to use; replacing the concept of take-make-waste (linear economy), so that the economy eventually produces zero waste. According to management consulting firm McKinsey, the circular economy represents a net materials cost savings opportunity of US$340 to US$380 billion in the European Union’s (EU) automotive and other transport sectors. In the fast-moving consumer goods sector, material savings could represent as much as 20 percent of materials input costs incurred by the consumer goods industry at the global level or equal to approximately US$700 billion or 1.1 percent of global gross domestic product (GDP).

Stop Littering

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This Playbook developed by the Coordinating Ministry for Maritime Affairs and Investments presents the key elements an initiator would need to consider in creating a Stop Littering initiative, all the way from identifying and selecting the appropriate target audience, addressing the key perceptions and the challenges that keep the audience from behaviour change, choosing the right stakeholders to support the initiative, knowing the key considerations in creating and designing the messages and campaign materials, outlining the communication plan, and setting the adequate tools to measure the effectiveness of the effort and identify future improvements.

Sorting & Recycling

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This Playbook developed by the Coordinating Ministry for Maritime Affairs and Investments presents the key elements an initiator would need to consider in creating a Sorting and Recycling initiative, all the way from identifying and selecting the appropriate target audience, addressing the key perceptions and the challenges that keep the audience from behaviour change, choosing the right stakeholders to support the initiative, knowing the key considerations in creating and designing the messages and campaign materials, outlining the communication plan, and setting the adequate tools to measure the effectiveness of the effort and identify future improvements.

Reduced Usage

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This Playbook developed by the Coordinating Ministry for Maritime Affairs and Investments presents the key elements an initiator would need to consider in creating a Reduced Usage initiative, all the way from identifying and selecting the appropriate target audience, addressing the key perceptions and the challenges that keep the audience from behaviour change, choosing the right stakeholders to support the initiative, knowing the key considerations in creating and designing the messages and campaign materials, outlining the communication plan, and setting the adequate tools to measure the effectiveness of the effort and identify future improvements.

Behavior Change

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ID EN ID EN This Playbook developed by the Coordinating Ministry for Maritime Affairs and Investments presents the key elements an initiator would need to… Read More »Behavior Change

The Amsterdam City Doughnut

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This document sets out the City Portrait for Amsterdam, known as the Amsterdam City Doughnut. It presents city life and its impacts through four ‘lenses’ – social, ecological, local, and global – which together provide a new perspective on what it means for a city to thrive. In essence, it invites city stakeholders to ask themselves a very 21st century question:
“How can Amsterdam be a home to thriving people, in a thriving place, while respecting the wellbeing of all people, and the health of the whole planet?”

Social Circular Economy: Opportunities for People, Planet, and Profit

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The social circular economy unites the circular economy and social enterprise concepts to deliver benefits for people, planet and profit. It allows a fully systemic view by drawing on the environmental principles of the circular economy and the societal vision of social enterprise, both of which are underpinned by a pursuit for economic prosperity. It thus aligns well with enhancing wellbeing for people and planet and the UN’s Sustainable Development Goals.